Volume Archives: Vol. 43 No 2 (September 2017)

MITIGATION OF CLIMATE CHANGE THROUGH FODDER PRODUCTION SYSTEMS–A REVIEW

AKHILA C. THAMPI* AND USHA C. THOMAS
AICRP on Forage Crops & Utilization
College of Agriculture, Vellayani,
Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala- 695 522, India
*(e-mail : akhiohm@gmail.com)
(Received : 1 March 2017; Accepted : 15 July 2017)

SUMMARY

Livestock production is a major source of GHGemissions, and reducing meat consumption or changing from ruminant to non-ruminant meat could have a number of environmental benefits. Improving management of grazing land has the greatest mitigation potential of all agricultural interventions, over 1.5 bt CO2 equivalents/year, sufficient to offset all the emissions from livestock production. In our view, ignoring the importance of forage-based systems may leave 50-80 per cent of the mitigation potential of agriculture untapped. Thus, improved grassland management and sustainable intensification of foragebased systems (through improved resource use efficiency, improved carbon sequestration, and reduced emissions due to BNI) are key to mitigating GHG emissions from livestock production, and will deliver other co-benefits such as increased productivity, reduced erosion, improved soil quality and nutrient and water use efficiency, resource conservation, reduced costs, and social and cultural benefits.

Key words: Climate change, fodder production system, food, by-products

Forage Res. 43(2) 73-80

FODDER CONSTRAINTS IN RAINFED AREAS OF INDIA : CONSTRAINTS AND STRATEGIES

V. VISHA KUMARI, K. A. GOPINATH, G. VENKATESH, MA SARATH CHANDRAN AND CH SRINIVASA RAO
ICAR-Central Research Institute for Dryland Agriculture
Hyderabad (Telangana), India
(e-mail : visha.venugopal@gmail.com)
(Received : 16 May 2017; Accepted : 5 September 2017)

SUMMARY

Owing to India’s first rank in livestock population, there is tremendous pressure on the limited feed and fodder resources, as land available for fodder production has been decreasing. This is more likely under dryland conditions as they face uncertainty with rainfall. Thus, the dryland farmers are unable to pay any attention towards assured fodder production. They mostly depend upon the crop stover for their livestock during season and face severe fodder shortage during lean period. This paper discusses the constraints and strategies for improving the fodder resources development and their availability in rainfed areas of the country.

Key words: Fodder, rainfed, agroforestry, weather anomalies, unexploited fodder species

Forage Res. 43(2) 81-88

TOP CROSS ANALYSIS FOR HETEROSIS AND COMBINING ABILITY IN FORAGE PEARL MILLET (PENNISETUM GLAUCUM L.)
RAHUL KAPOOR* AND PARDEEP SINGH
Department of Plant Breeding &
Genetics Punjab Agricultural University,
Ludhiana (Punjab), India
*(e-mail : rahulkapoor@pau.edu)
(Received : 29 July 2017; Accepted : 23 August 2017)

SUMMARY

A set of 15 CMS lines was top crossed to four populations as testers to obtain 60 top cross hybrids. The hybrids were evaluated for general combining ability (gca), specific combining ability (sca) and heterosis. The mean squares due to parents differed significantly for all the characters, thus indicating the presence of variability in the parent material for all the 16 traits. The variances due to gca and sca were significant. The computed variance ratio (σ2sca/σ2gca) revealed the predominance of non-additive gene action in the inheritance of quality traits. The perusal of the estimates of general and specific combining ability variances indicated the preponderance of non-additive gene action in the inheritance of all the traits. For GFY, five CMS lines 01777A (5.36), 543A (5.03), 92222A (4.70), 315A (3.03) and 111A (1.78) and two testers viz., RBC-2 (0.79) and Giant Bajra (0.64) were good general combiners with highly significant positive gca effects. The hybrids 315A × RBC-2, 543A × GFB-1, 01777A × Giant Bajra, 92222A × GFB-1 and 408A × Giant Bajra topped the list of crosses for forage yield. This high yielding ability was contributed by significant values of traits viz., plant height, number of tillers per plant and leaf area index.

Key words: Combining ability, environments, forage, heterosis, hybrids, pearl millet, quality

Forage Res. 43(2) 89-96

ASSESSMENT OF DIETARY FIBRE IN CAKE OF DIFFERENT SUNFLOWER GENOTYPES
BUNTY SHARMA*, R. K. SHEORAN, NARESH KUMAR THAKRAL, VIVEK K. SINGH AND REENA
Department of Genetics & Plant Breeding
CCS Haryana Agricultural University,
Hisar-125 004 (Haryana), India
*(e-mail : sharmabunty097@gmail.com)
(Received : 15 April 2017; Accepted : 27 June 2017)

SUMMARY

Sixteen genotypes of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) were studied at Oilseeds Section, Department of Genetics Plant Breeding, CCSHAU, Hisar during spring 2015, for structural carbohydrates and in vitro digestibility. Neutral detergent fiber, acid detergent fiber and lignin varied from 26.8′ to 35.2′, 19.9′ to 27.7′ and 6.19′ to 9.28′, respectively. Cellulose varied from 17.5 to 26.4 per cent, whereas hemicellulose content ranged between 4.52 and 5.89 per cent. Variation in protein and crude fibre was from 24 to 30 and 30.11 to 40.40. In the whole seed meal (cake), all samples had a high NDF content than ADF contents. The genotype HSFH 1599 showed maximum hemicellulose content, while minimum lignin content. The genotype HSFH 1589 showed lower values for crude fibres and cellulose content. A highly significant but negatively correlated was observed between ADF and NDF. CF showed highly significant and positive correlation with ADF, cellulose and lignin. A genetic strategy of breeding material can bring about a highly nutritive genotype of sunflower for animal feed.

Key words: ADF, NDF, dietary fibre, correlation and sunflower cake

Forage Res. 43(2) 97-100

GENETIC DIVERGENCE IN FODDER OAT (AVENA SATIVA L.) FOR YIELD AND QUALITY TRAITS
ATMAN POONIA AND D. S. PHOGAT*
Department of Genetics & Plant Breeding
CCS Haryana Agricultural University,
Hisar-125 004 (Haryana), India
*(e-mail : dsphogatccshau@gmail.com)
(Received : 14 August 2017; Accepted : 10 September 2017)

SUMMARY

The present investigation was carried out with 92 genotypes of oat maintained in the germplasm of Forage Section, Department of Genetics & Plant Breeding, CCSHAU, Hisar. The Mahalonbis’ D2 statistics for genetic divergence divided 92 oat genotypes into nine clusters indicating presence of substantial genetic diversity in the evaluated germplasm. The average inter-cluster distance was found to be highest between clusters IV and IX followed by clusters I and VIII. The minimum inter-cluster distance was noticed between clusters V and VI. The minimum intra-cluster distance was noticed in cluster I and highest intra-cluster distance was observed in cluster VII. The clusters I, II and IV had higher cluster mean values for most of the characters. Therefore, use of the genotypes viz., JO 1, ALGERIAN, HFO 912, DULO, UPO 212, OS 6, OS 305, HJ 8, OS 403, HFO 879, HFO 878, JHO 2006-4, JHO 851, HFO 832, HFO 409, HFO 831 and FOS 1/29 which fall in these clusters might be considered as potential parents for obtaining high heterotic response and consequently better segregants for dry matter yield in forage oat.

Key words: Diversity, oat, clusters, fodder

Forage Res. 43(2) 101-105

GENETIC DIVERGENCE IN FODDER RICEBEAN (VIGNA UMBELLATA)
MONICA JYOTI KUJUR*, S. K. BILAIYA, A. K. MEHTA AND V. MEENA
Research Scholar, Department of Plant Breeding & Genetics
Jawaharlal Nehru Krishi Vishwa Vidyalaya,
Jabalpur-482 004 (M. P.), India
*(e-mail : monikajyotikujur@gmail.com)
(Received : 25 April 2017; Accepted : 22 August 2017)

SUMMARY

Eighty-five ricebean genotypes were analyzed for genetic divergence which resulted in six clusters having maximum inter-cluster distance between cluster II and VI and least between clusters I and V. Maximum intra-cluster distance was exhibited by cluster VI followed by cluster IV. Putative lines selected were from cluster II (JRB 08-6, JRB 08-6-1 and JRB 07-4) for days to flower initiation, dry matter yield per plant, dry matter yield per plant per day, crude protein yield per plant and crude protein yield per plant per day; cluster VI (JRO 15-6, KRB 86-1 and JRB 07-35-3) for green fodder yield per plant, number of leaves per plant, plant height, days to 50 per cent flowering, number of branches per plant, green fodder yield per plant per day and leaf : stem ratio, and cluster IV (JRO 15-1, JRO 15-4 and JRO 15-3) for leaf area, stem diameter, root length, fresh root weight and dry root weight. These lines can be used as patents in different hybridization programmes to obtain maximum variation for further selection.

Key words: Genetic divergence, D2 analysis, cluster analysis, ricebean, fodder yield

Forage Res. 43(2) 106-109

ESTIMATES OF GENETIC VARIABILITY, HERITABILITY AND GENETIC ADVANCE IN OATS (AVENA SP.) FOR SEED AND FODDER YIELD TRAITS
TANVI KUMARI, Y. JINDAL* AND SATPAL
Department of Genetics & Plant Breeding
CCS Haryana Agricultural University,
Hisar-125 004 (Haryana), India
*(e-mail : yjindalhau@gmail.com)
(Received : 25 April 2017; Accepted : 30 June 2017)

SUMMARY

Fifty diverse genotypes of oats were evaluated for different qualitative and quantitative traits to assess the genetic diversity during rabi 2015-16. These genotypes were evaluated for 22 yield and its component traits to assess the genetic diversity. The genotypic and phenotypic coefficient of variations in terms of unit of their expression were observed highest for seed yield per plant, seed width and 100seed weight. Low estimates of genotypic coefficient of variation (GCV) and phenotypic coefficient of variation (PCV) were recorded for days to 50 per cent flowering, days to maturity, leaves per plant, culm diameter, flag leaf length, tillers per plant, plant height at maturity and green fodder yield per plant. The estimates of high heritability (broad sense) were noticed in almost all the characters like plant height, days to 50 per cent flowering, leaves per plant, flag leaf width, flag leaf length, leaf length, leaf width, culm diameter, number of nodes on the main tiller, days to maturity, tillers per plant, peduncle length, axis length, axis node number, green fodder yield per plant, dry fodder yield per plant, dry matter per cent, seed yield, 100-seed weight, seed length and seed width. The high estimates of genetic advance as per cent of mean were recorded for number of flag leaf length, flag leaf width, leaf length, leaf width, tillers per plant, peduncle length, axis length, green fodder yield per plant, dry matter per cent, seed yield, 100-seed weight and seed width. High heritability coupled with high genetic advance for traits viz., flag leaf length, flag leaf width, leaf length, leaf width, tillers per plant, peduncle length, axis length, green fodder yield per plant, dry matter per cent, seed yield, 100-seed weight and seed width.

Key words: Oats, genetic diversity, genetic variability parameters, heritability, genetic advance

Forage Res. 43(2) 110-115

GROWTH AND QUALITY OF FORAGE PEARL MILLET (PENNISETUM AMERICANUM L.) AS INFLUENCED BY NITROGEN AND ZINC LEVELS IN HYPER ARID REGION OF RAJASTHAN
VIMAL KHINCHI*, S. M. KUMAWAT, MOHD. ARIF AND JITENDRA VERMA
Department of Agronomy
S. K. Rajasthan Agricultural University,
Bikaner-334 006 (Rajasthan), India
*(e-mail : vk97agro@gmail.com)
(Received : 19 April 2017; Accepted : 6 July 2017)

SUMMARY

A field experiment was conducted on sandy loam soils of Agronomy Farm at College of Agriculture, SKRAU, Bikaner during kharif season of 2014 to study the effect of nitrogen and zinc on growth, nutrient content and uptake and quality of fodder pearl millet (Pennisetum americanum L.), with 20 treatment combinations viz., five nitrogen levels (0, 30, 60, 90 and 120 kg/ha), and four zinc sulphate doses (no zinc, 15, 30 and 45 kg/ha). The experimental results indicated that application of nitrogen @ 90 kg/ha being at par with higher N dose (120 kg/ha) significantly increased all growth characters viz., plant height, number of leaves/plant, tillers/plant, leaf : stem ratio and chlorophyll content of leaves. Whereas, number of leaves/ plant increased up to the highest N level of 120 kg/ha during both cutting stages in fodder pearl millet. The quality parameters, namely, crude protein and ether extract increased significantly with increasing nitrogen dose up to 120 kg/ha, but nitrogen fee extract (NFE) and total digestible nutrient (TDN) content in fodder showed reverse trend and recorded the maximum values under control treatment at both the cuttings. Application of zinc sulphate (ZnSO4) up to 30 kg/ha significantly improved growth characters at both the cutting stages. Moreover, the quality parameters also improved with doses of ZnSO4 up to 45 kg/ha.

Key words: Ash, crude protein, crude fiber, ether extract, NFE,TDN, growth, nutrient uptake

Forage Res. 43(2) 116-120

FODDER YIELD, QUALITY AND NUTRIENTS UPTAKE POTENTIAL OF DIFFERENT TYPES OF SORGHUM (SORGHUM BICOLOR) VARIETIES IN CENTRAL GUJARAT
DIGVIJAY SINGH* AND AVINASH CHAUHAN**
Animal Nutrition Group
National Dairy Development Board,
Anand-388001 (Gujarat), India
*(e-mail : dsingh@nddb.coop; ** achauhan@nddb.coop )
(Received : 21 March 2017; Accepted : 16 May 2017)

SUMMARY

A study was conducted for two years to evaluate 15 sorghum varieties belonging to sweet sorghum, dual purpose and forage types, for green fodder yield, chemical & nutrients composition and nutrient uptake potential under double cut system at 75 days interval. The highest green fodder yield (71.28 t/ha) was observed in sweet sorghum variety CSH 22 SS which was found at par with forage varieties HC 308 and CSV 21F. Among forage varieties, HJ 513 recorded higher green fodder yield (69.48 t/ha). All the sorghum varieties were found at par amongst themselves on the basis of dry matter and crude protein yields. Significant differences were observed in sorghum varieties green fodder for variation in crude protein (4.32-7.08%), ether extract (1.32-2.53%), crude fibre (22.71-31.69), silica (2.9-4.1%) and dry matter (25.91-33.11%) content. Differences for nutrients composition were recorded significant in green fodder of sorghum varieties for nitrogen, potash, calcium, magnesium, copper and manganese minerals. However, nutrient uptake (kg/ha) by sorghum varieties was found significant for calcium and magnesium minerals only.

Key words: Fodder sorghum, sweet sorghum, forage sorghum, fodder yield, quality parameters, nutrient uptake, mineral content

Forage Res. 43(2) 121-128

INFLUENCE OF SOWING DATES AND CUTTING INTERVALS ON GROWTH AND SEED YIELD OF ALFALFA (MEDICAGO SATIVA L.) CV. RL-88
P. R. ARVIND KUMAR*, B. C. CHANNAKESHAVA, V. BELAVADI, M. K. SHIVPRAKASH AND R. SIDDARAJU
Ph. D. scholar, Department of Seed Science and Technology,
University of Agriculture Sciences, College of
Agriculture GKVK, Bengaluru-560 065 (Karnataka),
*(e-mail : arvindkrathod09@gmail.com)
(Received : 5 June 2017; Accepted : 8 September 2017)

SUMMARY

An experiment was carried out at the department of Seed Science and Technology (E-block) College of Agriculture, UAS, GKVK, Bengaluru to find out the optimum date of sowing and cutting interval in alfalfa. The results on growth parameters indicated that significantly highest plant height, forage yield (Fresh and dry forage yield) was recorded by 1st July sowing +no cutting over the cutting intervals followed. Similarly, the less number of days taken to flower initiation and days to 50 % flowering noticed in 15th August sown crop + cut followed at 60 DAS (D4C1). The number of vegetative and generative branches per plant also found maximum in D4C1. The number of seeds per pod (6.67), seed yield (1.49 g plant-1), seed yield (161.07 g plot-1) and seed yield (355.00 kg ha-1) recorded higher in crop sown at 15th August + cutting followed at 60 DAS were recorded over others sowing dates and cutting interval.

Key words: alfalfa, cutting intervals, vegetative and generative branches, dry matter

Forage Res. 43(2) 129-135

RESIDUAL TOXICITY OF METRIBUZIN BASED HERBICIDE MIXTURES APPLIED IN WHEAT ON SUCCEEDING FODDER MAIZE
SARITA RANI, SURESH KUMAR* AND V. S. HOODA
Department of Agronomy
CCS Haryana Agricultural University,
Hisar-125 004 (Haryana), India
*(e-mail : sureshsilla@gmail.com)
(Received : 25 July 2017; Accepted : 6 September 2017)

SUMMARY

A field experiment was conducted during 2014-15 and 2015-16 at Research Farm, CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar, Haryana (India) in a semi-arid climate to study the residual effect of metribuzin based herbicide mixtures applied in wheat on the biomass production of succeeding fodder maize. The experiment was laid out in split plot design with three replications. The treatments consisting of five varieties of wheat viz., WH 1105, HD 2967, DPW 621-50, WH 1124 and DBW 17 in main plots and six weed management practices i. e. Metribuzin (210 g/ha), metribuzin+fenoxaprop (150+100 g/ ha), metribuzin+pinoxaden (150+40 g/ha), metribuzin+clodinafop (150+45 g/ha), weed free and weedy check in sub-plots. All the herbicide treatments were applied at 35 days after sowing (DAS) of wheat. Fodder maize was planted after the harvest of wheat crop to study the residual effect of herbicides. The results revealed that neither the varieties nor the herbicides/weed management practices had any influence on the number of plants at 15 and 45 DAS, plant height at 30 and 45 DAS and above ground biomass of maize at 45 DAS. Further, no visual symptom of any residual toxicity was observed in the fodder maize plants.

Key words: Wheat, maize, residual effect, clodinafop, metribuzin, pinoxaden, fenoxaprop

Forage Res. 43(2) 136-140

PERCEIVED FEASIBILITY OF DAIRY FARMING SYSTEM IN HARYANA STATE
SAROJ KUMARI*, NISHI SETHI AND VINAY MEHALA
Department of Extension Education and Communication Management
CCS Haryana Agricultural University,
Hisar-125 004 (Haryana), India
*(e-mail : saroj208@gmail.com)
(Received : 20 August 2017; Accepted : 10 September 2017)

SUMMARY

Dairying is one of the important enterprises, which supports the rural households by providing gainful employment and steady income. The importance of milk and milk products for the physical development and well-being of human beings is universally recognized. In India, women’s involvement in livestock management is a longstanding tradition and dairy farming has been an integral part of homestead farming system. The present study was conducted in Hisar district of Haryana state. From Hisar district, two blocks–Adampur and Hisar-I were selected randomly. From selected blocks, two villages, namely, Siswal from Adampur and Dabra from Hisar-1 were selected by random technique. From each selected village, 50 women were selected randomly, thus making a total sample of 100 women. From selected villages, 20 women who were interested in training on dairy farming were selected purposively. Feasibility of dairy farming revealed that majority of dairy farming was perceived ‘as very easy to understand and use’ by 59 per cent followed by 78 per cent who perceived dairy farming as ‘most profitable’, physical/cultural compatibility of dairy farming was perceived as most compatible by 35 per cent respondents, (45%) somewhat observable, triability was perceived by 45 per cent respondents who found most triable.

Key words: Perceived feasibility, dairy farming, women

Forage Res. 43(2) 141-144

EFFECTS OF LINSEED OIL FEEDING ON CARCASS TRAITS AND MEAT COMPOSITION IN BROILER CHICKENS
JYOTI SHUNTHWAL*, SAJJAN SIHAG, MADHU SUDAN GURAY AND NANCY SHEORAN
Department of Animal Nutrition, College of Veterinary Sciences,
LLR University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences,
Hisar-125004, Haryana, India
*(e-mail : jyotishunthwal.112@gmail.com)
(Received : 5 September 2017; Accepted : 25 September 2017)

SUMMARY

A study was carried out in the Department of Animal Nutrition at LUVAS, Hisar, in the year 2015. This study was aimed to investigate the effect of replacing sunflower oil with linseed oil on carcass traits and meat quality of broiler chickens. A total of 300 day-old commercial broiler chicks were procured and randomly distributed into five treatments, each treatment had six replicates with ten chicks in each. Growth trial of 6 weeks was conducted in a complete randomized design comprising five dietary treatment groups. The control group (T1) was on basal diet with sunflower oil as per BIS 2007 specification, while T2, T3, T4 and T5 were fed with linseed oil replacing sunflower oil of control group @ 25, 50, 75 and 100%, respectively. Treatment groups with linseed oil had no significant effect on dressing percentage and eviscerated yield compared to control group. Giblet percentage of all dietary treatments with linseed oil was significantly lower (P<0.05) than the control group. Moisture and crude protein of the breast and thigh muscle were not affected by inclusion of different levels of linseed oil. Whereas, the fat content of breast muscle with 50, 75 and 100%; and of thigh muscle with 75 and 100% linseed oil supplementation was significantly lower (P<0.05) than the control group. Result showed significant (P<0.05) difference in saturated fatty acid (SFA) and Poly unsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) content of breast and thigh muscle as compared to the control group. The SFA (palmitic acid and stearic acid) content of thigh muscle in dietary treatment group with 75 and 100% replacement with linseed oil decreased significantly (P<0.05) as compared to control group. However, the SFA content of breast muscle in each level of linseed oil decreased significantly (P<0.05) as compared to control group. Mono unsaturated fatty acid (MUFA), the oleic acid decreased (P<0.05) in group having linseed oil at the level of 50,75 and 100% as compared to control group in both muscles. The n-6 PUFA linoleic acid and arachidonic acid content in both breast and thigh muscles decreased at the level of 50, 75 and 100% sunflower oil replacement with linseed oil than the control group. The n-3 PUFA linolenic acid content increased significantly (P<0.05) in all groups with different linseed oil (25, 50, 75 and 100%) levels as compared to the sunflower oil group. A significant increase in poly-unsaturated FA (PUFA), n-3 FA and a significant decrease in n-6:n-3 were noticed in breast and thigh muscle due to dietary incorporation of linseed oil in the diets, the effect being more pronounced at the highest level of supplementation. The results of study inferred that supplementation of linseed oil in ration of broilers improves the quality of meat in terms of increased n3 PUFA proportion with lean meat production which is beneficial for human health.

Key words: Linseed oil, broiler, breast, thigh, saturated fatty acid, poly unsaturated fatty acid, mono unsaturated fatty acid

Forage Res. 43(2) 145-150

ASSESSMENT OF QUALITY COMPONENTS IN MULTICUT FORAGE SORGHUM IN DIFFERENT ENVIRONMENTS
ASHOK KUMAR DEHINWAL*, S. K. PAHUJA, M. SHAFIQURRAHAMAN AND ANIL KUMAR
Department of Genetics and Plant Breeding,
CCS Haryana Agricultural University,
Hisar-125 004 (Haryana), India
*(e-mail : ashokdehinwalccshau@gmail.com)
(Received : 5 September 2017; Accepted : 25 September 2017)

SUMMARY

Hybrids were developed in a Line x Tester mating fashion on six females (lines) using four males (testers) to estimate the variability in quality traits in different environments. For this purpose, 24 specific cross combinations were developed by using these 10 diverse parents during kharif season in 2014-15. These hybrids along with 10 parents and two standard checks (SSG 59-3 and MFSH 4) were evaluated at two locations (Hisar and Karnal) with early and late sowing during kharif season in 201516. The analysis of variance indicated the presence of variability among hybrids and their parents. High and positive environmental index showed that E1 was the best environment for the expression of protein content, protein yield, in vitro dry matter digestibility, dry matter digestibility and HCN content. Hybrids 31A × IS 2389 recorded minimum HCN content (33.41 mg per kg green weight) followed by 9A × HJ G 46 (35.50 mg per kg green weight), 9A × HJ 541(38.18 mg per kg green weight). Other hybrids that showed low HCN content were 56A × IS 2389 (41.75 mg per kg green weight), 31A × HJ 513 (42.91 mg per kg green weight), 467A × G 46 (46.95 mg per kg green weight) and 9A × HJ 513 (47.92 mg per kg green weight)

Key words: Sorghum bicolor, environment, quantitative traits, green fodder yield and dry fodder yield

Forage Res. 43(2) 151-155

MULTIVARIATE ANALYSIS IN MUNGBEAN (VIGNA RADIATA) FOR GENETIC DIVERSITY UNDER RAINFED CONDITION
GAURAV KUMAR GARG, P. K. VERMA AND HARI KESH*
Department of Genetics and Plant Breeding,
CCS Haryana Agricultural University,
Hisar-125 004, Haryana, India
*(e-mail : harikeshkaul55@gmail.com)
(Received : 6 September 2017; Accepted : 25 September 2017)

SUMMARY

The present study was undertaken to provide information on nature and magnitude of genetic diversity among promising genotypes of mungbean using Mahalanobis’s D2 statistic planted in the research area of the Department of Dryland Agriculture, Chaudhry Charan Singh Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar (Haryana) during kharif 2014. These genotypes were grouped into six clusters. The highest intracluster distance was observed for cluster III (3.874) and the lowest was observed for cluster II (3.537). While the highest inter-cluster distance was observed between cluster I and VI (6.315). Cluster IV formed monogenotypic cluster. Cluster III showed the maximum mean value (35.407) for harvest index, plant height (31.85) and seed yield (2.51). The highest contribution toward the total genetic divergence was recorded for harvest index, plant height, days to maturity and biological yield per plant. Selection index (I) aimed at selection on several characters simultaneously indicated that genotypes, RMG-991, MH539, ML-776, MH-560, MH-934, ML-682 and Pusa-0672 had performed better and are important for further breeding programme aimed at improvement of yield.

Key words: Mungbean, genetic diversity, cluster analysis, rainfed condition

Forage Res. 43(2) 156-159