EFFECT OF DIFFERENT FUNGICIDES, ORGANIC AMENDMENTS AND BIO-CONTROL AGENTS ON DRY ROOT ROT OF CLUSTER BEAN [CYAMOPSIS TETRAGONOLOBA (L.) TAUB] CAUSED BY RHIZOCTONIA BATATICOLA (TAUB.) BUTLER
AMAN DHAWAN*, SATISH KUMAR, PANKAJ KUMAR SHARMA AND RAKESH KUMAR CHUGH
Department of Plant Pathology, College of Agriculture,
CCS Haryana Agricultural University,
Hisar, Haryana, India 125 004 (Haryana), India
*(e-mail : dhawan.29@gmail.com)
(Receieved : 2 March 2019; Accepted 28 March 2019)

SUMMARY

Cluster bean [Cyamopsis tetragonoloba (L.) Taub.] is an important industrial crop of India. India leads the world in its area and production with 82 and 80 per cent of its global area and production, respectively. Among the various soil borne diseases, dry root rot disease causes heavy losses every year especially in arid and semi-arid regions. The dry root rot fungus Rhizoctonia bataticola was isolated from root rot infected cluster bean plant collected from the cluster bean field of Forage Section, CCSHAU Hisar. A measured amount of fungus suspension was mixed in the upper layer of sterilized soil and covered with a thin layer of sterilized soil for its establishment. Cluster bean seeds were sown at the rate of 10 seeds/pot after two days of inoculation of fungus. Four different fungicides viz., Bavistin, Captan, Thiram and Captan + Hexaconazole (a formulation with a mixture of two fungicide) were used as seed dressing at a dose of 2.0g/kg seed. A minimum disease incidence of 33.3 and 39.9 per cent was recorded when the seeds were coated with bavistin followed by captan+hexaconazole as compared to the highest incidence of 66.7 per cent in cluster bean cv. HG-365 in control pots. Soil incorporation of six organic amendments viz. neem cake, mustard cake, cotton cake and vermicompost at a dose of 2g/kg soil, poultry manure and mushroom spent compost at a dose of 5g/kg soil were tested individually against R. bataticola on cluster bean cv. HG 365. A minimum disease incidence of 36.9 and 39.9 per cent was recorded when the soils were incorporated with mustard cake followed by cotton cake. The effect of soil application of Glomus fasciculatum (VAM) at a dose of 400, 500, 600 sporocarps/kg soil were evalvated against R. bataticola. A maximum of 40 percent disease control was recorded when the soils were incorporated with VAM 600 sporocarps/kg soil followed by 25 per cent when soils were incorporated with 500 sporocarps/kg soil and a least disease control of 10 per cent was achieved at 400 sporocarps/kg soil. The effect of soil application of Trichoderma viride at a dose of 5g and 10g /kg soil was tested for the dry root rot disease management. A maximum of 34.8 per cent plant disease control was recorded when the soils were incorporated with T. viride at the rate of 10g/kg soil, whereas, the disease control was 25.1 per cent at 5g/kg soil.

Key words: Cluster bean, Bavistin, Sporocarps, Organic amendments, Trichoderma viride, Glomus
fasciculatum

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