Volume Archives: Vol. 43 No 4 (March 2018)

BUFFALO FEEDING MANAGEMENT PRACTICES ADOPTED IN RURAL AREAS OF WESTERN HARYANA
VIKAS GODARA, HARISH KUMAR GULATI NARENDER SINGH*, SUSHIL KUMAR AND ROBIN
Department of Livestock Production Management,
LUVAS, Hisar-125004 (Haryana), India
*(e-mail : singhnarender32vet@gmail.com)
(Received : 4 February 2018; Accepted : 15 March 2018)

SUMMARY

The present investigation was conducted in two districts (Bhiwani, Sirsa) of western Haryana.
Further two tehsil were selected from each district and two villages from each tehsil were selected randomly.
Twenty five buffalo rearers from each of village were selected thus making a sample of 200 buffalo rearers.
Results of this study revealed that, most of the farmers stall fed buffaloes and grazed in common pasture
land/ fallow fields. All the respondents used to chop dry fodder before feeding while 83.00 per cent of
respondent chopped green fodder. A large number of (79.00 per cent) of buffalo keeper fed wheat straw to
buffaloes. More than half, 63.00 per cent soaked and boiled concentrate mixture before feeding. A large
number of buffalo keeper fed concentrate mixture to buffaloes in advance pregnancy and young calves.
About 97.50 percent of respondent fed concentrate to young calf, while only 65.50 per cent fed concentrate
mixture to heifers. About 64.00 per cent of the respondents gave 3-5 kg. Concentrate to lactating buffaloes.
On the basis of this study it was recommended that buffalo keepers should be motivated through training
and demonstration for balanced feeding and preparation of balanced concentrate mixture at home. Subsidies
on mineral mixture and urea molasses mineral bricks should be provided to enhance these feed additives..

Key words: Western Haryana, rural, buffalo, feeding, management

322-326

COMPARATIVE ECONOMICS OF SEED PRODUCTION VIS-À-VIS COMMERCIAL GRAIN PRODUCTION IN CLUSTERBEAN IN HARYANA
AXAY BHUKER*, JITENDER KUMAR BHATIA1 ASHOK DHILLON* AND ASHOK KUMAR
Department of Seed Science & Technology,1Department of Agricultural Economics,
CCS, Haryana Agricultural University,
Hisar-125004 (Haryana), India
*(e-mail : bhuker.axay@gmail.com)
(Received : 30 November 2017; Accepted : 15 January 2018)

SUMMARY

The present analysis on cost of production for seed and grain production in clusterbean was worked out on per acre basis separately during 2016. The survey for grain production was conducted on 125 farmers of major clusterbean growing districts of Haryana viz., Hisar, Bhiwani, Fatehabad, Mahendergarh and Gurgaon. For estimation of economics of seed production the survey was conducted on 125 registered seed growers of various public and private seed producing organizations of state. It was analyzed from the study that total cost of seed production was Rs. 17125/- which was estimated 11 % higher than grain production and gross return from the seed production was Rs. 28950/- which was 52.4 % higher than grain production. Net return estimated from seed production of clusterbean was Rs.11825/- while in case of grain production it was Rs.-1444/- per acre. The benefit cost ratio for seed production was calculated 1:1.69. So it is concluded that seed production is more beneficial than crop production for the farmers to enhance his income by adopting the seed production instead of his traditional grain production.

Key words: Clusterbean, quality seed, economics, grain production

327-329

INTER-RELATIONSHIP OF GREEN FODDER YIELD WITH YIELD CONTRIBUTING AND QUALITY TRAITS IN AVENA SATIVA
RAHUL KAPOOR*
Department of Plant Breeding and Genetics,
Punjab Agricultural University,
Ludhiana-141 004, Punjab, India
*(e-mail : rahulkapoor@pau.edu)

(Received : 25 November 2017; Accepted : 20 January 2018)

SUMMARY

The present study was conducted for two years during Rabi season of 2010-2011 and 2011-12 with
25 diverse genotypes selected from wide range of germplasm being maintained at forage research farm,
Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana. The genotypes were analysed with two years pooled data for genetic
variability, correlation and path coefficients. High estimates of GCV and PCV were observed in many important
traits suggesting that selection based on these characters would facilitate successful isolation of desirable
types. High heritability along with high genetic advance (GA) was recorded for number of leaves/plant, leaf
width (cm), number of tillers/plant, leaf area index, leaf stem ratio, crude protein (%), dry matter yield/plot
(kg) and green fodder yield/plot (kg). Traits like plant height, number of leaves, leaf length, leaf width,
number of tillers/plant, stem girth and dry matter yield had positive and significant correlation at genotypic as
well as phenotypic level with green fodder yield and the selection based on these traits will result in improving
the green fodder yield in oat. Two important quality traits viz; crude protein and in vitro dry matter digestibility
manifested positive and significant correlation between each other but both were negatively correlated to
green fodder as well as dry matter yield. Traits like plant height, number of leaves/plant, leaf width, leaf area
index, leaf stem ratio, in-vitro dry matter digestibility and dry matter yield showed high direct effect on green
fodder yield. Taller plants with more number of leaves and tillers/plant, broader leaves, will be significant for
the improvement of green fodder yield in the material under study.

Key words: Genetic advance, genotypic coefficient of variation (GCV), heritability, phenotypic coefficient of variation (PCV), Green fodder yield components

330-333