LONG TERM IMPACTS OF DIFFERENT LAND USES ON FORAGE GRASSES UNDER DEGRADED LAND OF NORTH-WEST HIMALAYA, INDIA
J. K. BISHT, R. P. YADAV, B. M. PANDEY, P. K. MISHRA, D. MAHANTA, VIJAY SINGH MEENA AND A. PATTANAYAK
ICAR–Vivekanada Parvatiya Krishi Anusandhan Sansthan,
Almora–263601, Uttarakhand, (India)
(e-mail : rams34052@gmail.com)
(Received : 08 September 2018; Accepted : 20 September 2018)

SUMMARY

A long term field experiment was conducted to investigate the performance of different grasses under different land types in rainfed conditions under the NWH at experimental farm of ICAR – Vivekanada Parvatiya Krshi Anusandhan Sansthan, Almora. Significantly higher fresh and dry biomass was recorded with hybrid napier under all land conditions. However, in case of trees significantly higher biomass was recorded with deodar (Cedrus deodara Roxb.G.don) tree. Meanwhile, aus (Thysanolaena maxima) and local grass yielded significantly lower with all land uses, except under deodar tree, but its showed significantly lower production potential as compared to hybrid napier. In case of nutrient uptake (NPK) and concentration in forage were significantly higher with hybrid Napier as compared to rest of the grasses with different land uses. Results showed that the total forage (of all three grasses), were significantly reduced the nutrient uptake and concentration in forage grasses in consequently years; it may be due to the no application of the BMPs (best management practices). The forage yields of all the grasses were significantly higher in the area of deodar tree as compared to other land use situations due to favourable micro climatic conditions. The significantly increase in fodder production under deodar tree has been recorded to a combination of factors including IMPs (improved management practices) by shaded grass and its enhanced nutrient and water availability. From the six years study results showed that the hybrid napier grass under the deodar tree was the best management practices (BMPs).

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Forage Res. 44(2) 129-136